Are Prices Higher For the Poor in New York City?

Author
Keywords
Abstract

Despite earlier evidence to the contrary, recent inquiries appear to reach a consensus that the poor
pay more for food. However, these studies utilize samples drawn on the basis of prior
knowledge of unfair pricing strategies, proximity of volunteer surveyors, or other non-random
methods. This paper revisits the issue of price discrimination by analyzing price data collected
using a stratified, random sample design to answer the question of whether prices are higher in
poor, urban neighborhoods. Contrary to the recent literature, I find that market prices in poor
neighborhoods are not higher than those in more affluent areas.

Year of Publication
1999
Number
423
Date Published
09/1999
Publication Language
eng
Citation Key
Journal of Consumer Policy, vol. 23 (June 2000) 127-152
URL
Working Papers