unemployment

Author
Abstract

This paper presents a survey of recent microeconometric studies of
the labor market, focusing on research that emphasizes the possible
failure of measured wage rates to separate individual supply and demand
decisions. On both the demand and supply sides of the labor market
there is evidence that forces from the other side of the market
influence employment outcomes through some mechanism other than the
wage. On the supply side, this evidence takes the form of correlations
between individual labor supply outcomes and market—level measures of
employment demand in the individual's local labor market. On the demand
side, it takes the form of correlations between firms’ employment decisions and measures of their employees‘ outside opportunities. Both sets
of findings are inconsistent with simple supply and demand models, and
suggest the need for alternative models of the labor market, which
permit an uncoupling of short-run employment decisions from wage rates.

Year of Publication
1987
Number
228
Date Published
11/1987
Publication Language
eng
Citation Key
8354
Card, D. . (1987). Supply and Demand in the Labor Market. Retrieved from http://arks.princeton.edu/ark:/88435/dsp01pz50gw11t (Original work published November 1987)
Working Papers
Abstract

We propose a new econometric estimation method for analyzing the probability of leaving unemployment
using uncompleted spells from repeated cross-section data, which can be especially
useful when panel data are not available. The proposed method-of-moments-based estimator
has two important features: (1) it estimates the exit probability at the individual level and (2)
it does not rely on the stationarity assumption of the inflow composition. We illustrate and
gauge the performance of the proposed estimator using the Spanish Labor Force Survey data,
and analyze the changes in distribution of unemployment between the 1980s and 1990s during
a period of labor market reform. We find that the relative probability of leaving unemployment
of the short-term unemployed versus the long-term unemployed becomes significantly higher in
the 1990s.

Year of Publication
2003
Number
475
Date Published
05/2003
Publication Language
eng
Citation Key
8357
Guell, M. ., & Hu, L. . (2003). Estimating the Probability of Leaving Unemployment Using Uncompleted Spells from Repeated Cross-section Data. Retrieved from http://arks.princeton.edu/ark:/88435/dsp019p290934d (Original work published May 2003)
Working Papers
Abstract

This paper provides new evidence on job search intensity of the unemployed in the U.S., modeling job search intensity as time allocated to job search activities. The main findings are: 1) the average unemployed worker in the U.S. devotes about 41 minutes to job search on weekdays, which is substantially more than his or her European counterpart; 2) workers who expect to be recalled by their previous employer search substantially less than the average unemployed worker; 3) across the 50 states and D.C., job search is inversely related to the generosity of unemployment benefits, with an elasticity between -1.6 and -2.2; 4) the predicted wage is a strong predictor of time devoted to job search, with an elasticity in excess of 2.5; 5) job search intensity for those eligible for Unemployment Insurance (UI) increases prior to benefit exhaustion; 6) time devoted to job search is fairly constant regardless of unemployment duration for those who are ineligible for UI. A nonparametric Monte Carlo technique suggests that the relationship between job search effort and the duration of unemployment for a cross-section of job seekers is only slightly biased by length-based sampling.

Year of Publication
2008
Number
532
Date Published
08/2008
Publication Language
eng
Citation Key
8384
Krueger, A. ., & Mueller, A. . (2008). Job Search and Unemployment Insurance: New Evidence from Time Use Data. Retrieved from http://arks.princeton.edu/ark:/88435/dsp01th83kz34p (Original work published August 2008)
Working Papers
Author
Abstract

I focus on two aspects of Job loss. First, I examine evidence on the
incidence of job loss by worker and job characteristics including age,
education, race, sex, industry, and tenure over the period from 1982 to 1991.
Second, I examine the cost of job loss to workers in the form of 1) lower
post-displacement employment probabilities, 2) lower probabilities of
full-time employment for re—employed workers, and 3) lower earnings for
full-time workers.
Using data from Displaced Workers Surveys (DWS) from 1984 through 1992
to study job loss from 1982-91, I find that older workers and more educated
workers are relatively more likely to suffer a job loss in the latter part of
this period. Additionally, job loss became more common in some important
service industries and relatively less common in manufacturing during the
latter part of the ten-year period studied.
Supplementing the DWS data with data from the outgoing rotation groups
of the Current Population Survey from 1982-1991, I find that displaced workers
are, relative to non-displaced workers, 1) less likely to be employed and 2)
more likely to be employed part-time conditional on being employed. These
effects seem to decline with time since displacement. There is no systematic
secular change in these costs of displacement, either in the aggregate or for
particular groups. Finally, I examine the earnings losses of full-time
re—employed displaced workers by comparing their earnings change with the
earnings change of full-time employed workers who were not displaced. I find,
consistent with what others have found, that these earnings losses are
substantial.
Overall, the costs to displaced workers of job loss are substantial and
come in several forms. However, the public perception that the current
sluggish economy is worse than earlier downturns may reflect more who has lost
jobs recently rather than either increased overall job loss or increased costs
to those who are losing Jobs.

Year of Publication
1993
Number
309
Date Published
01/1993
Publication Language
eng
Citation Key
Brookings Papers on Economic Activity: Microeconomics, 1993.
Farber, H. . (1993). The Incidence and Costs of Job Loss: 1982-1991. Retrieved from http://arks.princeton.edu/ark:/88435/dsp01tb09j5655 (Original work published January 1993)
Working Papers
Abstract

Recent efforts to expand unemployment insurance (UI) eligibility are expected to increase low-earning workers’ access to UI. Although the expansion’s aim is to smooth the
income and consumption of previously ineligible workers, it is possible that UI benefits simply displace other sources of income. Standard economic models predict that UI delays reemployment, thereby reducing wage income. Additionally, low-earning workers are often eligible for benefits from means-tested programs, which may decrease with UI benefits. In this paper, we estimate the impact of UI eligibility on employment, means-tested program participation, and income after job loss using a unique individual-level administrative data set from the state of Michigan. To identify a causal effect, we implement a fuzzy regression discontinuity design around the minimum earnings threshold for UI eligibility. Our main finding is that while UI eligibility increases jobless durations by up to 25 percent and temporarily lowers receipt of cash assistance (TANF) by 63 percent, the net impact on total income is still positive and large: In the quarter immediately following job loss, UI-eligible workers have 46-61 percent higher incomes than ineligibles.

Year of Publication
2015
Number
591
Date Published
09/2015
Publication Language
eng
Citation Key
9246
Leung, P. ., & O’Leary, C. . (2015). Should UI Eligibility Be Expanded to Low-Earning Workers? Evidence on Employment, Transfer Receipt, and Income from Administrative Data. Retrieved from http://arks.princeton.edu/ark:/88435/dsp01kw52jb45x (Original work published September 2015)
Working Papers
Author
Abstract

This paper provides new evidence on time use and subjective well-being of employed and unemployed individuals in 14 countries. We devote particular attention to characterizing and modeling job search intensity, measured by the amount of time devoted to searching for a new job. Job search intensity varies considerably across countries, and is higher in countries that have higher wage dispersion. We also examine the relationship between unemployment benefits and job search.

Year of Publication
2008
Number
524
Date Published
05/2008
Publication Language
eng
Citation Key
7865
Krueger, A. . (2008). The Lot of the Unemployed: A Time Use Perspective. Retrieved from http://arks.princeton.edu/ark:/88435/dsp01w37636771 (Original work published May 2008)
Working Papers
Abstract

While policymakers often promote further education for displaced workers, evidence on its effectiveness in the U.S. context primarily comes from evaluations of specific government sponsored training programs, which only represent one narrow avenue for skill acquisition. This paper studies the returns to retraining among unemployed workers, where retraining is broadly defined as enrollment in community colleges, four-year institutions, and technical centers. We link together high quality administrative records from the state of Ohio and estimate the returns using a matching design in which we compare the labor market outcomes of similar workers who do and do not enroll. Our matching specification is informed by a separate validation exercise in the spirit of LaLonde (1986), which evaluates a wide array of estimators using a combination of experimental and non-experimental data in a setting similar to ours. We graphically present the average quarterly earnings trajectories of the enrollees and matched non-enrollees over a nine-year period and show that there is little difference in earnings pre-enrollment, followed by temporarily depressed earnings among enrollees during the first two years after enrolling, and sustained positive returns thereafter. We find that enrollees experience an average earnings gain of seven percent three to four years after enrolling, and that the returns are driven by those who switch industries, particularly to healthcare.

Year of Publication
2020
Number
642
Date Published
05/2020
Publication Language
eng
Citation Key
11701
Pei, Z. ., & Leung, P. . (2020). Further Education During Unemployment. Retrieved from http://arks.princeton.edu/ark:/88435/dsp01tt44pq76n (Original work published May 2020)
Working Papers
Abstract

This paper examines the impact of selected labor market changes on the decline in the unemployment rate in the 1990s. The first section provides an overview of aggregate unemployment trends, inflation, and price and wage Phillips curves. The second section examines the effect of demographic changes on the unemployment rate. The third section examines the impact of the 150 percent increase in the number of men in jail or prison since 1985 on the unemployment rate. The fourth section examines the impact of evolving labor market intermediaries (namely worker profiling by the Unemployment Insurance system and the growth of the temporary help industry) on the unemployment rate. The fifth section explores whether worker bargaining power has become weaker, allowing for low unemployment and only modest wage pressure, because of worker job anxiety, the decline in union membership, or increased competitive pressures. The final section examines the impact of the tightest labor market in a generation on poverty. Our main findings are that changes in the age structure of the labor force, the growth of the male prison population, and, more speculatively, the rise of the temporary help sector, are the main labor market forces behind the low unemployment rate in the late 1990s.

Year of Publication
1999
Number
416
Date Published
05/1999
Publication Language
eng
Citation Key
Brookings Papers on Economic Activity, Vol 0, No. 1, 1999
Krueger, A. ., & Katz, L. . (1999). The High-pressure U.S. Labor Market of the 1990s. Retrieved from http://arks.princeton.edu/ark:/88435/dsp01dr26xx37d (Original work published May 1999)
Working Papers
Author
Abstract

This paper studies the effects of the introduction of fixed-term contracts in Spain on the duration distribution of unemployment, with particular emphasis on the changes in duration
dependence. Since the introduction of fixed-term contracts in the mid 1980s, the Spanish labor market has become more dynamic in terms of inflows and outflows from unemployment to employment. I estimate a parametric duration model using cross-sectional data drawn from the Spanish Labor Force Survey from 1980 to 1994, which allows me to analyze the chances of leaving unemployment before and after the introduction of fixed-term contracts. I find evidence that for very short durations, of up to five months, the probability of leaving unemployment has increased since the introduction of fixed-term contracts. But the reverse is true for longer durations. Also, the chances of finding a job are significantly higher for those workers who became unemployed because their fixed-term contract came to an end than for
those who lost their job for other reasons. In addition, there is less duration dependence for
those who lost their job due to the expiration of a fixed-term contract than for those who lost their job for other reasons.

Year of Publication
2000
Number
443
Date Published
08/2000
Publication Language
eng
Citation Key
7930
Guell, M. . (2000). The effects of fixed-term contracts on the duration distribution of unemployment: the Spanish case. Retrieved from http://arks.princeton.edu/ark:/88435/dsp01gh93gz498 (Original work published August 2000)
Working Papers
Abstract

During the 1980s a substantial gap emerged between unemployment rates in Canada and the
United States. In this paper, we use microdata from labor force surveys at the beginning and
end of the decade to examine the sources of the emergent gap. As in earlier work, we find that
most of the relative rise in unemployment in Canada is attributable to an increase in the relative
"labor force attachment" of Canadians, rather than to any shortfall in relative employment.
Indeed, relative employment rates increased in Canada over the 1980s for younger workers and
for adult women. The relative rise in labor force attachment of Canadians is manifested by a
sharp increase in the propensity of non-workers to report themselves as unemployed (i.e. looking
for work) rather than out-of-the-labor force. This change is especially pronounced for individuals
who work just enough to qualify for unemployment insurance (UI) in Canada. Moreover, two-
thirds of the relative increase in weeks of unemployment among non-workers is associated with
the divergent trends in UI recipiency in the two countries. Both findings point to the availability
of UI benefits as an important determinant of the labor force attachment of nonworkers.

Year of Publication
1996
Number
352
Date Published
12/1996
Publication Language
eng
Citation Key
In B. Curtis Eaton and Richard Harris (eds.), Trade, Technology and Economics: Essays in Honour of Richard G. Lipsey, Brookfield, MA:Edward Elgar, 1997
Riddell, C. ., & Card, D. . (1996). Unemployment in Canada and the United States: A Further Analysis. Retrieved from http://arks.princeton.edu/ark:/88435/dsp0108612n53n (Original work published December 1996)
Working Papers