Craig Riddell

First name
Craig
Last name
Riddell
Abstract

A growing fraction of U.S. workers face a dual system of medical insurance, with
generous coverage through the Workers’ Compensation system for work-related injuries, but
limited or non-existent coverage for off-the-job illnesses or injuries. Uninsured and under-
insured workers have an economic incentive to report off-the-job injuries as work accidents.
Many analysts have interpreted the high rate of Monday injuries -- especially for hard-to-detect
injuries like back sprains -- as evidence of this incentive. We combine administrative data on
workplace injury claims with Current Population Survey data on medical insurance coverage to
compute the fraction of Monday injury claims for workers who are more and less likely to have
medical insurance. We find that workers with lower medical coverage rates are no more likely
to report a Monday injury than other workers.

Year of Publication
1994
Number
327
Date Published
04/1994
Publication Language
eng
Citation Key
Industrial and Labor Relations Review, Vol. 49 No. 4 (July 1996)
Riddell, C. ., & Card, D. . (1994). Is Workers’ Compensation Covering Uninsured Medical Costs? Evidence from the ’Monday Effect’. Retrieved from http://arks.princeton.edu/ark:/88435/dsp01mk61rg93q (Original work published April 1994)
Working Papers
Abstract

The labor supply of female household heads is distributed across a wide
variety of hours and weeks choices. This papers explores the differential
nature of the weeks per year and hours per week decisions among female heads.
A model of labor supply which separates the weeks/hours decision is presented
and several forms of this model are estimated, allowing for simultaneity in
the weeks/hours decision, as well as for the presence of either fixed costs or
minimum constraints on low levels of hours and weeks of work. The results
indicate that these two decisions are separate, although not completely unrelated
Like previous researchers, I also find strong evidence of the need to separate
the labor force participation decision from the weeks and hours of work decision.
The paper ends with a discussion of the evidence on labor rationing among
these women, either through un- or underemployment.

Year of Publication
1985
Number
197
Date Published
07/1985
Publication Language
eng
Citation Key
Journal of Labor Economics, Vol. 6, No.2, April 1988
Riddell, C. ., & Blank, R. . (1985). Simultaneously Modelling the Supply of Weeks and Hours of Work Among Female Household Heads. Retrieved from http://arks.princeton.edu/ark:/88435/dsp01vx021f09w (Original work published July 1985)
Working Papers
Abstract

During the 1980s a substantial gap emerged between unemployment rates in Canada and the
United States. In this paper, we use microdata from labor force surveys at the beginning and
end of the decade to examine the sources of the emergent gap. As in earlier work, we find that
most of the relative rise in unemployment in Canada is attributable to an increase in the relative
"labor force attachment" of Canadians, rather than to any shortfall in relative employment.
Indeed, relative employment rates increased in Canada over the 1980s for younger workers and
for adult women. The relative rise in labor force attachment of Canadians is manifested by a
sharp increase in the propensity of non-workers to report themselves as unemployed (i.e. looking
for work) rather than out-of-the-labor force. This change is especially pronounced for individuals
who work just enough to qualify for unemployment insurance (UI) in Canada. Moreover, two-
thirds of the relative increase in weeks of unemployment among non-workers is associated with
the divergent trends in UI recipiency in the two countries. Both findings point to the availability
of UI benefits as an important determinant of the labor force attachment of nonworkers.

Year of Publication
1996
Number
352
Date Published
12/1996
Publication Language
eng
Citation Key
In B. Curtis Eaton and Richard Harris (eds.), Trade, Technology and Economics: Essays in Honour of Richard G. Lipsey, Brookfield, MA:Edward Elgar, 1997
Riddell, C. ., & Card, D. . (1996). Unemployment in Canada and the United States: A Further Analysis. Retrieved from http://arks.princeton.edu/ark:/88435/dsp0108612n53n (Original work published December 1996)
Working Papers