Ilyana Kuziemko

First name
Ilyana
Last name
Kuziemko
Abstract

Most existing work on the price elasticity of demand for health insurance focuses
on employees' decisions to enroll in employer-provided plans. Yet any attempt to
achieve universal coverage must focus on the uninsured, the vast majority of whom
are not offered employer-sponsored insurance. In the summer of 2008, we conducted
a survey experiment to assess the willingness to pay for a health plan among a large
sample of uninsured Americans. The experiment yields price elasticities substantially
greater than those found in most previous studies. We use these results to estimate
coverage expansion under the Affordable Care Act, with and without an individual
mandate. We estimate that 39 million uninsured individuals would gain coverage and
find limited evidence of adverse selection.

Year of Publication
2011
Number
565
Date Published
04/2011
Publication Language
eng
Citation Key
7836
Krueger, A., & Kuziemko, I. (2011). The Demand for Health Insurance among Uninsured Americans: Results of a Survey Experiment and Implications for Policy. Retrieved from http://arks.princeton.edu/ark:/88435/dsp01bc386j227 (Original work published 04/2011AD)
Working Papers
Abstract

It is well-documented that, since at least the early twentieth century, U.S. income inequality has varied inversely with union density. But moving beyond this aggregate relationship has proven difficult, in part because of the absence of micro-level data on union membership prior to 1973. We develop a new source of micro-data on union membership, opinion polls primarily from Gallup (N ≈ 980,000), to look at the effects
of unions on inequality from 1936 to the present. First, we present a new time series of household union membership from this period. Second, we use these data to show that, throughout this period, union density is inversely correlated with the relative skill of union members. When density was at its peak in the 1950s and 1960s, union members were relatively less-skilled, whereas today and in the pre-World War II period,
union members are equally skilled as non-members. Third, we estimate union household income premiums over this same period, finding that despite large changes in union density and selection, the premium holds steady, at roughly 15-20 log points, over the past eighty years. Finally, we present a number of direct results that, across a variety of identifying assumptions, suggest unions have had a significant, equalizing effect on
the income distribution over our long sample period.

Year of Publication
2018
Number
620
Date Published
05/2018
Publication Language
eng
Citation Key
10516
Naidu, S., Farber, H., Kuziemko, I., & Herbst, D. (2018). Unions and Inequality Over the Twentieth Century: New Evidence from Survey Data. Retrieved from http://arks.princeton.edu/ark:/88435/dsp01gx41mm54w (Original work published 05/2018AD)
Working Papers