Mingyu Chen

First name
Mingyu
Last name
Chen
Abstract

In the 1970s, the American Economic Association (AEA) was one of several professional associations to launch a summer program with the goal of increasing racial and ethnic diversity in its profession. In this paper we estimate the effectiveness of the AEA’s program which, to the best of our knowledge, is the first to rigorously study such a summer program. Using a comparison group consisting of those who applied to, but did not attend, the program and controlling for an array of background characteristics, we find that program participants were over 40 percentage points more likely to apply to and attend a PhD program in economics, 26 percentage points more likely to complete a PhD,and about 15 percentage points more likely to ever work in an economics-related academic job. Using our estimates, we calculate that the program may directly account for 17-21 percent of the PhDs awarded to minorities in economics over the past 20 years.

Year of Publication
2014
Number
581
Date Published
08/2014
Publication Language
eng
Citation Key
9076
Rouse, C., Becker, C., & Chen, M. (2014). Can a Summer Make a Difference? The Impact of the American Economic Association Summer Program on Minority Student Outcomes. Retrieved from http://arks.princeton.edu/ark:/88435/dsp01b5644r75d (Original work published 08/2014AD)
Working Papers
Author
Abstract

One million international students study in the U.S. each year and the majority of them compete in global labor markets after graduation. I conduct a large-scale field experiment to study how employers in China value U.S. college education. I sent over 27,000 fictitious online applications to business and computer science jobs in China, randomizing the country of college education. I find that U.S.-educated applicants are on average 18 percent less likely to receive a callback than applicants educated in China, with applicants from very selective U.S. institutions underperforming those from the least selective Chinese institutions. The U.S.-China callback gap is smaller at high-wage jobs, consistent with employers fearing U.S.-educated applicants have better outside options and will be harder to hire and retain. The gap is also smaller at foreign-owned firms, consistent with Chinese-owned firms knowing less about American education. Controlling for high school quality, test scores, or U.S. work experiences does not attenuate the gap, suggesting that it is not driven by employer perceptions of negative selection. A companion employer survey of 260 hiring managers finds consistent and additional supporting evidence for the experimental findings.

Year of Publication
2019
Number
627
Date Published
04/2019
Publication Language
eng
Citation Key
11111
Chen, M. (2019). The Value of U.S. College Education in Global Labor Markets: Experimental Evidence from China. Retrieved from http://arks.princeton.edu/ark:/88435/dsp016108vf04f (Original work published 04/2019AD)
Working Papers
Abstract

The F-1 student visa program brings more educated migrants to the US than any other immigration program, yet student visa applicants face an approximately 27 percent visa refusal rate that varies by time and region. Using data on the universe of SAT takers between 2004 and 2015 matched with college enrollment records, we examine how the anticipated F-1 visa restrictiveness influences US undergraduate enrollment outcomes of international students. Using an instrumental variables approach, we find that a higher anticipated F-1 student visa refusal rate decreases the number of international SAT takers, decreases the probability of sending SAT scores to US colleges, and decreases international student enrollment in the US. The decreases are larger among international students with higher measured academic achievement. We also document academic achievement of international students and show that over 40 percent of high-scoring international SAT takers do not pursue US college education.

Year of Publication
2020
Number
640
Date Published
04/2020
Publication Language
eng
Citation Key
11686
Chen, M., Howell, J., & Smith, J. (2020). Best and Brightest? The Impact of Student Visa Restrictiveness on Who Attends College in the US. Retrieved from http://arks.princeton.edu/ark:/88435/dsp01c534fr83n (Original work published 04/2020AD)
Working Papers