Alan Krueger

First name
Alan
Last name
Krueger
Abstract

This paper reviews and interprets the literature on the effect of
school resources on students‘ eventual earnings and educational
attainment. In addition, new evidence is presented on the impact
of the great disparity in school resources between black and white
students in North and South Carolina that existed in the first half
of the 20th century, and the subsequent narrowing of these resource
disparities. Following birth cohorts over time, gaps in earnings
and educational attainment for blacks and whites in the Carolinas
tend to mirror the gaps in school resources.

Year of Publication
1996
Number
366
Date Published
07/1996
Publication Language
eng
Citation Key
Journal of Economic Perspectives, Vol 10 No . 4, Fall 1996.
Krueger, A. ., & Card, D. . (1996). School Resources and Student Outcomes: An Overview of the Literature and New Evidence from North and South Carolina. Retrieved from http://arks.princeton.edu/ark:/88435/dsp01dz010q05z (Original work published July 1996)
Working Papers
Year of Publication
1993
Number
310
Date Published
01/1993
Publication Language
eng
Citation Key
American Economic Review Papers and Proceedings, 83 May, 1993
Krueger, A. ., & Card, D. . (1993). Trends in Relative Black/White Earnings Revisited. Retrieved from http://arks.princeton.edu/ark:/88435/dsp01nz805z69d (Original work published January 1993)
Working Papers
Author
Abstract

This paper compares the characteristics of 63 alleged homegrown Islamic terrorists in the U.S.A. to a representative sample of 1,000+ Muslim Americans. The alleged terrorists have about average level of education. Those with higher education were judged closer to succeeding.

Year of Publication
2008
Number
533
Date Published
09/2008
Publication Language
eng
Citation Key
8119
Krueger, A. . (2008). What Makes a Homegrown Terrorist? Human Capital and Participation in Domestic Islamic Terrorist Groups in the U.S.A. Retrieved from http://arks.princeton.edu/ark:/88435/dsp012f75r8023 (Original work published September 2008)
Working Papers
Author
Abstract

This paper analyzes data on 11,600 students and their teachers who were randomly assigned to
different size classes from kindergarten through third grade. Statistical methods are used to
adjust for non-random attrition and transitions between classes. The main conclusions are: (1)
on average, performance on standardized tests increases by 4 percentile points the first year
students attend small classes; (2) the test score advantage of students in small classes expands by
about one percentile point per year in subsequent years; (3) teacher aides and measured teacher
characteristics have little effect; (4) class size has a larger effect for minority students and those
on free lunch; (5) Hawthorne effects were unlikely.

Year of Publication
1997
Number
379
Date Published
05/1997
Publication Language
eng
Citation Key
Quarterly Journal of Economics, Volume 114, Issue 2, May 1999
Krueger, A. . (1997). Experimental Estimates of Education Production Functions. Retrieved from http://arks.princeton.edu/ark:/88435/dsp012v23vt38v (Original work published May 1997)
Working Papers
Abstract

Workers’ compensation insurance provides cash payments and medical.
benefits to workers who incur a work-related injury or illness. Many
features of the workers’ compensation program parallel features of proposed
mandated employer-paid health insurance plans. This paper empirically
examines the incidence of the workers’ compensation program to infer the
likely consequences of mandated health insurance proposals. In certain ,
industries, such as trucking and carpentry, workers’ compensation insurance
costs are quite large, and vary tremendously within states over time, and
across states at a moment in time. This variation is used to identify the
incidence of the program. Empirical analysis of two data sets suggest that
changes in employers’ costs of workers’ compensation insurance are largely
shifted to employees in the form of lower wages. In addition, higher
insurance costs are found to have a negative but statistically
insignificant effect on employment. The implied elasticity of labor demand
from our results is about -.50.

Year of Publication
1990
Number
279
Date Published
12/1990
Publication Language
eng
Citation Key
In David Bradford (ed.), Tax Policy and the Economy, Vol 5, (Cambridge, MA: The MIT Press, 1991)
Gruber, J. ., & Krueger, A. . (1990). The Incidence of Mandated Employer-Provided Insurance: Lessons from Workers’ Compensations Insurance. Retrieved from http://arks.princeton.edu/ark:/88435/dsp010c483j394 (Original work published December 1990)
Working Papers
Author
Abstract

Princeton Affect and Time Survey - Sample Programs

Year of Publication
2012
Date Published
2012-10-09
Publication Language
eng
Citation Key
8802
Krueger, A. . (2012). Research: ATUS Subjective Well-Being Module - Sample Programs. Retrieved from http://arks.princeton.edu/ark:/88435/dsp01xg94hp58j
Data sets
Abstract

This paper presents evidence on the quality of schooling by race and ethnic
origin in the United States. Although substantial racial segregation
across schools exists, the average pupil-teacher ratio is approximately the
same for black and white students. Hispanic students, however, on average have
l0 percent more students per teacher. Relative to whites, blacks
and Hispanics are less likely to use computers at school and at work. The
implications of these differences in school quality for labor market
outcomes are examined. We conclude by examining reasons for the increase
in the black-white earnings gap since the mid-1970s.

Year of Publication
1992
Number
301
Date Published
03/1992
Publication Language
eng
Citation Key
Brookings Papers on Economic Activity: Microeconomics, in Martin N. Bailey and Clifford Winston (eds.) 1992, pp. 269-326.
Boozer, M. ., Wolkon, S. ., & Krueger, A. . (1992). Race and School Quality Since Brown vs. Board of Education. Retrieved from http://arks.princeton.edu/ark:/88435/dsp01cz30ps65d (Original work published March 1992)
Working Papers
Keywords
Abstract

This paper summarizes and tries to reconcile evidence from the microeconometric and empirical
macro growth literatures on the effect of schooling on income and GDP growth. Much
microeconometric evidence suggests that education is an important causal determinant of income
for individuals within countries. At a national level, however, recent studies have found that
increases in educational attainment are unrelated to economic growth. This discrepancy appears to
be a result of the high rate of measurement error in first-differenced cross-country education data.
Afier accounting for measurement error, the effect of changes in educational attainment on income
growth in cross-country data is at least as great as microeconometric estimates of the rate of return
to years of schooling. Another finding of the macro growth literature -- that economic growth
depends positively on the initial stock of human capital -- is not robust when the assumption of a
constant-coefficient model is relaxed.

Year of Publication
2000
Number
429
Date Published
01/2000
Publication Language
eng
Citation Key
Journal of Economic Literature, Vol. 39, No. 4, December 2001
Lindahl, M. ., & Krueger, A. . (2000). Education for Growth: Why and For Whom?. Retrieved from http://arks.princeton.edu/ark:/88435/dsp011831cj939 (Original work published January 2000)
Working Papers
Abstract

Instrumental Variables (IV) estimates tend to be biased in the same direction as
Ordinary Least Squares (OLS) in finite samples if the instruments are weak. To address
this problem we propose a new IV estimator which we call Split Sample Instrumental
Variables (SSIV). SSIV works as follows: we randomly split the sample in half, and use
one half of the sample to estimate parameters of the first-stage equation. We then use these
estimated first-stage parameters to construct fitted values and second-stage parameter
estimates using data from the other half sample. SSIV is biased toward zero, rather than
toward the plim of the OLS estimate. However, an unbiased estimate of the attenuation
bias of SSIV can be calculated. We use this estimate of the attenuation bias to derive an
estimator that is asymptotically unbiased as the number of instruments tends to infinity,
holding the number of observations per instrument fixed. We label this new estimator
Unbiased Split Sample Instrumental Variables (USSIV). We apply SSIV and USSIV to the
data used by Angrist and Krueger (1991) to estimate the payoff to education.

Year of Publication
1993
Number
320
Date Published
10/1993
Publication Language
eng
Citation Key
Journal of Business and Economic Statistics, Vol. 13, No. 2, April, 1995
Angrist, J. ., & Krueger, A. . (1993). Split Sample Instrumental Variables. Retrieved from http://arks.princeton.edu/ark:/88435/dsp01tq57nr01r (Original work published October 1993)
Working Papers